Category

Home Maintenance

BBQ Safety

By | Healthy Home, Home Maintenance, Summer | No Comments

Barbeque Safety

by Nick Gromicko
With barbeque season already here, homeowners should heed the following safety precautions in order to keep their families and property safe.
  • Propane grills present an enormous fire hazard, as the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is aware of more than 500 fires that result annually from their misuse or malfunction. The following precautions are recommended specifically when using propane grills:
    • Store propane tanks outdoors and never near the grill or any other heat source. In addition, never store or transport them in your car’s trunk.
    • Make sure to completely turn off the gas after you have finished, or when you are changing the tank. Even a small gas leak can cause a deadly explosion.
    • Check for damage to a tank before refilling it, and only buy propane from reputable suppliers.
    • Never use a propane barbecue grill on a terrace, balcony or roof, as this is dangerous and illegal.
    • No more than two 20-pound propane tanks are allowed on the property of a one- or two-family home.
    • To inspect for a leak, spray a soapy solution over the connections and watch for bubbles. If you see evidence of a leak, reconnect the components and try again. If bubbles persist, replace the leaking parts before using the grill.
    • Make sure connections are secure before turning on the gas, especially if the grill hasn’t been used in months. The most dangerous time to use a propane grill is at the beginning of the barbeque season.
    • Ignite a propane grill with the lid open, not closed. Propane can accumulate beneath a closed lid and explode.
    • When finished, turn off the gas first, and then the controls. This way, residual gas in the pipe will be used up.
  • Charcoal grills pose a serious poisoning threat due to the venting of carbon monoxide (CO). The CPSC estimates that 20 people die annually from accidentally ingesting CO from charcoal grills.  These grills can also be a potential fire hazard. Follow these precautions when using charcoal grills:
    • Never use a charcoal grill indoors, even if the area is ventilated. CO is colorless and odorless, and you will not know you are in danger until it is too late.
    • Use only barbeque starter fluid to start the grill, and don’t add the fluid to an open flame. It is possible for the flame to follow the fluid’s path back to the container as you’re holding it.
    • Let the fluid soak into the coals for a minute before igniting them to allow explosive vapors to dissipate.
    • Charcoal grills are permitted on terraces and balconies only if there is at least 10 feet of clearance from the building, and a water source immediately nearby, such as a hose (or 4 gallons of water).
    • Be careful not to spill any fluid on yourself, and stand back when igniting the grill. Keep the charcoal lighter fluid container at a safe distance from the grill.
    • When cleaning the grill, dispose of the ashes in a metal container with a tight lid, and add water. Do not remove the ashes until they have fully cooled.
    • Fill the base of the grill with charcoal to a depth of no more than 2 inches.
  • Electric grills are probably safer than propane and charcoal grills, but safety precautions need to be used with them as well. Follow these tips when using electric grills:
    • Do not use lighter fluid or any other combustible materials.
    • When using an extension cord, make sure it is rated for the amperage required by the grill. The cord should be unplugged when not in use, and out of a busy foot path to prevent tripping.
    • As always, follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
Safety Recommendations for General Grill Use
  • Always make sure that the grill is used in a safe place, where kids and pets won’t touch or bump into it. Keep in mind that the grill will still be hot after you finish cooking, and anyone coming into contact with it could be burned.
  • If you use a grill lighter, make sure you don’t leave it lying around where children can reach it. They will quickly learn how to use it.
  • Never leave the grill unattended, as this is generally when accidents happen.
  • Keep a fire extinguisher or garden hose nearby.
  • Ensure that the grill is completely cooled before moving it or placing it back in storage.
  • Ensure that the grill is only used on a flat surface that cannot burn, and well away from any shed, trees or shrubs.
  • Clean out the grease and other debris in the grill periodically. Be sure to look for rust or other signs of deterioration.
  • Don’t wear loose clothing that might catch fire while you’re cooking.
  • Use long-handled barbecue tools and flame-resistant oven mitts.
  • Keep alcoholic beverages away from the grill; they are flammable!
In summary, homeowners should exercise caution when using any kind of grill, as they can harm life and property in numerous ways.
Credit of this article goes to Nick Gromicko of InterNACHI.

Ant Inspections

By | Home Inspections, Home Maintenance, Pests, Spring | No Comments

Ant Inspection

by Nick Gromicko

Ants are among the most prevalent pests in households, restaurants, hospitals, offices, warehouses, and virtually all buildings where food and water can be found. While mostly harmless to humans, ants (especially carpenter ants) can cause considerable building damage.  Inspectors can expand their knowledge base by being able to identify some of the telltale signs of ant infestation.
Ant Behavior
Ants are social insects that live in colonies divided into three castes: queens, males and workers. Most of the ants you may observe, which are responsible for gathering food, are sterile female workers. Winged males and females will leave the nest to mate, and to find suitable locations for new colonies. After mating, the males die and the impregnated females (queens) shed their wings and lay eggs that will hatch into the legless, grub-like larvae. The queen takes care of these larvae as they develop until they finally become pupae. Within a few weeks, adult worker ants emerge from these pupae and take over the job of tending the young.

Distinguishing Ants from Termites

Winged ants are often mistaken for winged termites, which also leave their nests to mate. These insects can be distinguished from one another by three main characteristics:

  • The ant’s body is constricted, giving it the appearance of having a thin waist, while the termite’s body is not constricted.
  • The ant’s hind wings are smaller than its front wings, while the termite’s front and hind wings are about the same size. Wings might not always be present, however, as both species eventually lose them.Ants and termites are different in three key ways
  • Winged female and worker ants have elbowed antennae, while the termite’s antennae are not elbowed.

Termites and ants both construct nests in moist wood, but ant nests are typically smoother and lack mud structures commonly found in termite nests. Also, termites actually subsist on wood, so the structural damage they leave it their wake is generally more severe than that caused by ants, which merely tunnel through wood.

Nests

Carpenter ants nest in both moist and dry wood, but they prefer moist wood. Accordingly, nests are more likely to be found in wood dampened by water leaks, such as wood around bathtubs and sinks, poorly sealed windows and door frames, roof leaks and poorly flashed chimneys. Nests are especially common in moist, hollow spaces, such as the wall void behind a dishwasher and in a hollow deck column. As there will often be no external signs of damage, probing the wood with a screwdriver helps reveal the excavated “galleries.” Another technique for locating hidden nests is to tap along baseboards and other wood surfaces with the blunt end of a screwdriver while listening for the hollow sound of tunneled wood. If a nest is nearby, carpenter ants often will respond by making a rustling sound within the nest.

Inspection

The following clues are evidence that a building is host to an ant infestation:

  • long trails of ants, perhaps numbering in the hundreds or thousands. Ants assemble in long trails along structural elements, such as wires and pipes, and frequently use them to enter and travel within a structure to their destination. Follow the trail to locate their nest or their entry point, such as an electrical outlet, or gap along a baseboard or around a water pipe;Ants entering, or exiting, a lightswitch
  • a few straggler ants. These are scouts in search of food and nesting sites. They, too, may be followed back to the nest to betray their family;
  • holes or cracks in walls or foundations, especially where pipes enter the building, and around windows and doors. These can provide entry points for ants and other insects. Kitchens are other food storage and preparation areas are particular problem areas;
  • frass deposits. Frass is the fine sawdust produced after galleries are carved out of the wood. If you suspect that a piece of woodwork hosts a gallery, you can tap on it with a screwdriver tip and see if any dust falls away;
  • a distinctive rustling sound similar to the crinkling of cellophane. Ants are small, but nests are large enough to produce perceptible noise; and
  • outside, inspect for nests in mulch and vegetation next to the foundation. Check under potted plants, patio blocks, stepping stones, in piles of rocks, lumber and firewood.
Exclusion Practices
A number of steps can be taken by homeowners to reduce the potential for future ant problems, such as:
  • Store food items that attract ants, such as sugar, syrup, honey, and pet food in closed containers. Wash them to remove residues from outer surfaces.
  • Rinse out empty soft drink containers or remove them from the building.
  • Thoroughly clean up grease and spills.
  • Remove garbage from buildings daily and change liners frequently.
  • Correct roof and plumbing leaks and other moisture problems that will attract ants.
  • Eliminate wood-to-ground contact, such as where landscaping has pushed soil or mulch up against the wood siding of a home.
  • Clip back tree limbs and vegetation touching the roof or siding of the house. Limbs and branches serve as bridges between tree limb nests and the structure.
  • Seal cracks and openings in the foundation, especially where utility pipes and wires enter from the outside.
  • Stack firewood away from the foundation, and elevate it off the ground. Never store firewood in the garage or other areas of the home, as firewood is a major ant nesting area.
In summary, ants are complex creatures that create structural defects in buildings. Inspection and exclusion techniques should be practiced.

Credit of this article goes to Nick Gromicko of InterNACHI.

Early Spring Lawn Care

By | Home Beautification, Home Maintenance, Spring | No Comments

Caring for your lawn depends on the climate. For cool-seasons, there is a technique gardeners can do in order for their lawn to maintain the lush and green characteristic. There is some tweaking here and there whenever the season changes, but the basic program indicated here is what most lawns in Canada need.

Know Your Soil
During growing season, you have to know your soil by conducting soil tests. Some of these come in pre-paid boxes that can be ordered online or bought in the store. The soil test indicates the amount of acidity (pH), the main nutrients such as phosphorus, nitrogen and potassium, present, the organic matter and the micronutrients. The test will also point out the deficiencies which can be corrected.

Healthy soil needs biological activity. Therefore, there is a need for microorganisms and earthworms. The biological activity entails enough organic matter in order for the lawn to flourish in its natural green state.

In early spring, there must be the cleaning up and aeration of the lawn. Here is how you can do it: Wait for the snow to melt and the lawn to dry, then power-rake to remove excess and aerate the lawn by using spiked clogs.

Why Aerate?
Aeration alleviates the compact thickness in between the ground’s density which results from gravity and winter snows. Through this cleaning up process, the soil gets injected by oxygen, making it easier for biological activity to take place. It also helps the penetration of fertilization in the roots.

It also helps to apply organic herbicides. The amount should be at least 20 lbs for every 1000 sq. ft. Choose organic herbicides that are made from corn gluten meal or have been proven to be a pre-emergent herbicides that are organic.

Afterwards, apply complete organic fertilizer. The amount is the same as that of the herbicide – 20 lbs for every 1000 square feet. You can alternately apply herbicides and fertilizers every six weeks. Choose a fertilizer that is made from the best blended organic materials.

Mowing Tips
When it comes to mowing, it is best to do so at a cutting height of 3 inches as a short lawn will be less resistant to weeds and will dry out and burn faster. The root system mimics the length of the length of the blades of grass, so the longer the stronger. The exception to this rule is when they are the last cuts of the season by cutting low to an inch. We recommend to leave clippings on the lawn and keep the blade of your mower sharp. Research shows that there are benefits to cutting the lawn. One of which is that the weeds are choked out, therefore making the roots develop and resistant to hardiness and drought.

Thanks to Carlos Armando Siguenza for providing the information above! If you are in the Calgary, Alberta area and looking for a landscaping specialist – check out Armandos Gardening!

Armandos Gardening
www.armandosgardening.ca
(403) 589-0019

Landscaping services in the Calgary Area.

Landscaping services in the Calgary Area.

Other Helpful Articles:
Green Law Care – Edmonton Journal.

CO Safety in Your Home

By | Healthy Home, Home Maintenance, Indoor Air Quality | No Comments

Carbon Monoxide (CO) is a risk that every homeowner needs to be aware of and manage to ensure a healthy and sound family home. It known as the silent killer as it is a colorless and odorless gas that has toxic effects for people and pets. CO gas is a byproduct produced through the combustion of fuel-burning appliances that are commonly found in homes, such appliances as: furnace, gas water heater, gas stove, gas dryer, gas barbeque, portable generators and fuel-burning space heaters. Running a vehicle in your garage can also produce toxic gases, even if the garage door is open.

Improper maintenance, poor ventilation or dysfunction of these appliances can cause a carbon monoxide leak with the risk of poisoning higher in enclosed spaces.

Symptoms of CO Poisoning

  • nausea
  • headaches
  • burning eyes
  • drowsiness
  • confusion
  • loss of consciousness

These symptoms tend to disappear with fresh air. However, medical attention may still be necessary if you have been exposed.

How to Keep Your Home Safe

  1. Annual maintenance and inspection of fuel-fired appliances such as your furnace, hot water tank, stove, fireplace.
  2. Installing Carbon Monoxide detectors throughout your home, regular testing and replacing upon expiry.

When in doubt of actual age of a carbon monoxide and/or fire detector we strongly recommend you to error on the side of caution and replace upon taking possession of your new home.

Home Maintenance - Smoke-Co Alarms

Carbon Monoxide Detectors…

It is best practice to have a carbon monoxide detector on every level of your home. There are carbon monoxide detectors that you can plug into your wall, battery powered and those built into your fire detector. CO detectors have an average expiry of 7 years and need to be replaced upon expiry. In our home, ours were only good for 60 months, so be sure to check! It is the best to have your detectors hardwired in so that when one alarm is triggered, all of your detectors will sound.

Not all carbon monoxide alarms sold in Canada adhere to Canadian Safety Standards. Look for one with the CSA or ULC symbols.

Be sure to mark your devices so that you are well aware of their expiry!

Related Links

Website on CO Safety
Home Depot – CO Detectors
Carbon Monoxide Poisoning – Home Safety – Kidde
Stay Safe from CO – ATCO Gas

Seeking Assistance? Check out our Trusted Vendors for an electrician who would be happy to help.

If you suspect a gas leak, Call ATCO Gas immediately, they will do a free house visit to inspect further. 

ATCO Gas 24-hour Emergency Services: Edmonton and Area 1-780-420-5585 | Calgary and Area 1-403-245-7222 | All Other Areas 1-800-511-3447

5 Ways Mice Enter Your Home In the Fall

By | Healthy Home, Home Maintenance, Winterizing | No Comments

5 WAYS MICE ENTER YOUR HOME IN THE FALL

In the autumn there is no question about it, mice will find any means necessary to find shelter. This means that your home could be at risk of a mouse infestation. Mice are masters of finding any way in a building they can, this is because they are able to squeeze through holes the size of a dime! And because cracks and holes in your foundation, windows, and roof are inevitable, nearly every home is a candidate for mice infestations.

Mice are full of diseases and they can also do extensive damage to your home:

  • They can spread diseases such as hantavirus (deer mice), salmonella, and listeria through their urine, droppings, saliva and nesting materials.
  • Because mice breed year-round and able to produce five to ten litters per year, with an average of 6-8 babies per litter, you could have up to 60 mice gnawing at your furniture, rugs, and your walls (to name a few of their favourite treats).
  • They can burn your house down, literally. They love chewing on wires to keep their teeth short and to gain access to places that the wires may be blocking. Mice can chew through soft concrete, wood, drywall rubber, plastic pipes, insulation, aluminum and even gas lines. Expensive repairs!

Rodent proof your house, here are my top 4 suggestions:

1.  Caulking – Go around your house and seal off the cracks and holes

2.  Clean up debris around your house – especially dog poop

3.  Don’t leave garbage and recycling in your garage

4.  Weather-stripping, especially your garage door. Mice will stay out

Happy Fall Season!

This article was brought to you by:

Bill Martin
Martin’s Pest Control
www.martinspestcontrol.com
(403) 460-7213

Important Questions to Ask During Your Home Inspection

By | Healthy Home, Home Inspections, Home Maintenance, Uncategorized | No Comments

At Bocc Home Inspections we like to help educate our clients on the important items of their new home. We do this through including tips and photographs in the report, marking important shut offs with custom tags, demonstrating how and where the following items are within each home.

Here is a list of questions we suggest to ask during your home inspection:

  • Grading: Is the grade around my entire home sloped away from my foundation walls and window wells?
  • Smoke alarms: How do I test the smoke detector?
  • Ventilation: What is a ventilation switch? Should it be on or off? How does it work with the heating system?
  • Furnace: Where is the disconnect breaker or switch located for the furnace?
  • Water: Where is the main water shut off? Kitchen and bathroom sink water shut off (if present)? Toilet water shut off?
  • Electrical: Where is the electrical panel? How do I turn breakers on and off and how do I reset them?
  • Detectors: Where are the smoke detectors, carbon monoxide detectors, arc fault circuit interrupters and ground fault circuit interrupters? Where are the instruction manuals that are provided with these devices?
  • Eavestroughs: Are the eavestrough down spouts connected and directed away from my home and not towards my neighbour?

At Bocc Home Inspections we like to answer these questions and provide tips on these extra things to help ensure our clients can have a healthy and sound home, Because Our Company Cares For first time home buyers we also include a home maintenance manual as an extra resource for their journey of homeownership.

Easy Guide to Staining Your Deck and Fence

By | Home Beautification, Home Maintenance | No Comments

Easy Guide to Staining your Deck and Fence

Applying a wood treatment such as a stain or paint help prolong the life of your exterior wood by protecting it from the sun’s rays and moisture. Skipping maintenance on your exterior wood you risk having the wood dry, crack, split, warp, turn grey and rot.

PREPPING TO STAIN

Sand
Adam’s favorite thing to do! Not… Sanding is never a good time, though it is very important to sand to avoid splinters if you have splitting and cracks in your deck. For a semi-transparent stain it is important to sand in the same direction of the wood’s grain to avoid the scratches & resulting staining lines caused from sanding against the grain. Therefore, a sanding puck or a belt sander would work better than an orbital sander. We rented a handheld belt sander from Home Depot for $16/4hrs or $23/24hrs and a 2-pack of belts for $15.

Clean
Whether your deck has been stained before or not it is important to clean the wood with a deck cleaner before staining. It took me awhile to wrap my head around this, as I was looking to save time by skipping this step as our deck hasn’t been stained before so I thought it would be considered cleaned. However, it helps open the pours, removes BBQ grease, dirt, and bits of grass or whatever may be in your deck or fence. With your fence it may be more difficult to spread the cleaner on, so I was told that you COULD wash the fence with your garden hose (NOT A PRESSURE WASHER – this will damage the fibres of the wood) if it hasn’t been treated before. Though it is always best to use a wood cleaner on all exterior wood before painting/staining, nonetheless.

Tips for Applying a Wood Cleaner:
1. Spray the wood with your garden hose first
2. Apply the cleaner however you feel is best – could use a painting roller or pump sprayer. We chose to use a painting roller.
3. Scrub the cleaner on wood using a push broom.
4. Let sit for 15 Minutes.
5. Rinse off with garden hose.
6. Let it properly dry for 2 days before staining.

APPLY WOOD STAIN

Selecting Wood Paint/Treatment
You can go with a transparent, semi-transparent or solid color. If you prefer to see a wood grain you need to select a transparent or semi-transparent stain (this is what we chose!). For Alberta’s climate it is important to find a stain with good sunscreen properties and UV protection in order to extend the lifespan of your exterior wood. Having some waterproofing properties is important as well, though in Alberta we don’t get tons of rain so I was told this is less of a priority. When you have higher water-resistant stain you will likely have a glossier and more smooth of a coating on top which will make your deck more slippery, especially when there is snow on top of it. With us having kiddos we are going to choose one that is less glossy in order to prevent falls and accidents.

Stain/Paint
For solid stains or paints you could use a roller to apply, with following up with a brush to get the stain into the cracks and seams. With a semi-transparent stain you will want to use a brush to apply the stain on the wood. It is best to complete a piece of wood then move onto the next in order to have the stain blend nicely in. Be cautious around siding when applying the paint, you may like to use green painters tape to prevent paint and splashes from getting on your siding. Be sure to apply 2 coats, this helps your color and wood protection to last longer. It should be able to last 1-3 years.

After all that hard work, be sure to pour yourself a cold one and enjoy your beautiful deck/fence!

 

 

Make Sure Home Improvement Projects are Up to Code Before Selling

By | Home Inspections, Home Maintenance | No Comments

Make sure home improvement projects are up to code before selling!

Make Sure Your Home Improvement/Maintenance Projects are Up to Code Before Selling

It’s almost always a good idea to boost the appeal of your property prior to listing a home for sale. But there are right ways and wrong ways to do it. If you’re handy and creative, there is no reason not to tackle some of the routine maintenance and upkeep items yourself. But, depending on the scope and size of the improvements, you might be required to seek permission and approval of your local government officials.

Knowing when to do so is key to your success. Neglecting prior approval and final inspection may potentially negate all your good intentions, cost you additional money and, perhaps, even make your property unsalable.

Building Codes

Most governmental jurisdictions and some neighbourhood associations require that homeowners submit plans and seek approval for major projects. Additions, structural alterations, plumbing and electrical improvements, and various other home projects are likely to require permits and inspections. Your city might require a permit to build a fence or a wall, to pour concrete for a driveway, to have a new roof installed, or to change out the windows for more energy-efficient models. Always check with the authorities before beginning any work.

Generally, no permit is needed to replace kitchen appliances or plumbing fixtures, to repaint interior walls or replace flooring, or to add decorative lighting and landscaping elements. But, if your home is located in a gated community or a subdivision that has strict association requirements, you might need committee approval for exterior alterations.

While most of the requirements detailed in the National Building Code of Canada address safety, design and construction of new commercial buildings, the code also governs demolition, use changes and alterations to existing buildings. A significant portion of the code addresses housing and small buildings. Recent code changes deal with stairways and ramps, railings and guardrails, among other updates. Associated standards deal with fire safety, electrical standards, plumbing requirements and energy. Individual provinces and jurisdictions may impose additional or slightly different requirements.

Know the Requirements

National and local standards are enforced by local building inspectors. Although existing homes may not be in compliance with current codes, it is important to remember that buyers are looking for safety and value. It can be financially advantageous to make changes that modernize your property on top of the usual upgrades you may be thinking of.

Always check with local authorities regarding current code requirements for insulation, electrical standards, plumbing, heating and air conditioning systems, ventilation and vent pipes, fans and toxic substance detectors, in addition to standards for stairs and railings, and for driveways and walkways. Whether you do the work yourself or hire a contractor, ask about permits and fees, and whether or not inspections are required.

Document the Changes

Most buyers will respond favourably to evidence of updates that reduce energy costs, increase home safety, or add to a home’s usability and appearance. Keep detailed records of costs and dates, permits and inspections, whether you replace an old water heater, install new attic insulation, or repair an ailing fence. Take before and after pictures if it’s appropriate. If you complete an addition, relocate the electrical panel, or add a sliding glass door, note when the work was completed, the names of architects and contractors, and the date of final inspection, issuance of a certificate of occupancy or project approval. Also keep a copy of the approved plans and any materials specifications or product warranties.

Your home projects, no matter how large or small, should result in a faster sale and a higher price. If you have questions about the value of planned improvements, you might want to check with a certified home inspector or your real estate agent.

Barbecue Cleaning Tips

By | Home Beautification, Home Maintenance, Uncategorized | No Comments

How to Clean & Maintenance your BBQ

Last summer we had an incident where the grease in our tray caught fire in our BBQ, requiring us to use our fire extinguisher to put out the fire before it spread.  Grease fires can be extra dangerous as often someone’s first instinct is to throw water on it, which only causes it to spread! We hope everyone has a fire extinguisher in their home for the unexpected times such as this.

With the arrival of barbequing season we wanted to share some tips on how to prevent fires such as this through proper cleaning & maintenance on your BBQ.

How to Clean a Gas BBQ Grill

  1. Turn off and disconnect the gas bottle(propane tank).
  2. Clean your BBQ grill while still warm.  Use steam cleaning trick (below) to keep it warm while eating.
  3. Brush and/or scrape your grill grates and hot plates to remove burned on food.
  4. Use your dishwasher to clean your grates and hot plates.
  5. Clean inside of grill with warm soapy water and a stiff brush.
  6. Rinse off Teflon grill sheets.
  7. Clean the drip tray by discarding foil and absorbent material.
  8. Clean outside if grill with warm soapy water and a soft sponge.
  9. Re-assemble grill grates and hot plates.
  10. Replace drip tray foil and refill with BBQ grease absorbent mix or kitty litter.
  11. Re-position Teflon grill sheets.
  12. Reconnect your gas bottle and check connections for leaks with soapy water.
  13. Run the BBQ grill on high for 15 minutes to burn off any remaining soap or water.
  14. Apply cooking oil to grates and hot plates to re-season.

Remember to be careful with painted and stainless steel surfaces.

Use non-scratch scrubbers, always test on a small area and follow the grain on any stainless steel.

SOURCE: Elgas.com

Simply Ways to Declutter Your Home

By | Home Maintenance, Uncategorized | No Comments

25 Things You Can Clear Out of Your Home

Get a Head Start on Spring Cleaning!

  1. The old cell phone you ditched when you upgraded.
  2. Power cords that don’t work/aren’t needed/you don’t even know what they belong to.
  3. Worn out or extra cooking utensils and measuring cups.
  4. Mugs you kind of hate.
  5. Lingerie, socks and underwear you never wear.
  6. Ripped, stained, damaged clothes you’re holding onto for whatever reason.
  7. Throw pillows that no longer go with your decor.
  8. Linens you don’t use.
  9. Kids artwork (take a pic first!). You could incorporate all the photos into a photobook!
  10. Tax paperwork older than seven years.
  11. Shoes you haven’t worn in over a year.
  12. Makeup that’s old.
  13. Hair ties & pins that are in bad shape.
  14. Nail polish that’s crusted shut/out of style/gross.
  15. Underwear/boxers that have holes in them (keep the mouse in the house).
  16. Books you’re never going to read again.
  17. Toys your kids never play with.
  18. Jewelry you haven’t worn in more than a month.
  19. Old cans of paint (colors that are no longer in your home) taking up space in the storage room.
  20. A sentimental item you’ve been guilted into keeping that you don’t want.
  21. Clothing in storage that is just taking up space.
  22. Outdoor wear that is outdated or unloved (touques, mix-matched gloves, scarves, snowpants, coats etc…).
  23. Old magazines and paperwork that have already been read.
  24. Cleaning products and chemicals . Be sure to dispose of safely!
  25. Fridge & pantry items –check expiry dates.

A great way to donate your unwanted items that are still in good condition to goodwill, family in need or a ‘Giveaway’ page on Facebook.

 

“If you don’t love it or use it, it is clutter!”