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Home Inspections

Ant Inspections

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Ant Inspection

by Nick Gromicko

Ants are among the most prevalent pests in households, restaurants, hospitals, offices, warehouses, and virtually all buildings where food and water can be found. While mostly harmless to humans, ants (especially carpenter ants) can cause considerable building damage.  Inspectors can expand their knowledge base by being able to identify some of the telltale signs of ant infestation.
Ant Behavior
Ants are social insects that live in colonies divided into three castes: queens, males and workers. Most of the ants you may observe, which are responsible for gathering food, are sterile female workers. Winged males and females will leave the nest to mate, and to find suitable locations for new colonies. After mating, the males die and the impregnated females (queens) shed their wings and lay eggs that will hatch into the legless, grub-like larvae. The queen takes care of these larvae as they develop until they finally become pupae. Within a few weeks, adult worker ants emerge from these pupae and take over the job of tending the young.

Distinguishing Ants from Termites

Winged ants are often mistaken for winged termites, which also leave their nests to mate. These insects can be distinguished from one another by three main characteristics:

  • The ant’s body is constricted, giving it the appearance of having a thin waist, while the termite’s body is not constricted.
  • The ant’s hind wings are smaller than its front wings, while the termite’s front and hind wings are about the same size. Wings might not always be present, however, as both species eventually lose them.Ants and termites are different in three key ways
  • Winged female and worker ants have elbowed antennae, while the termite’s antennae are not elbowed.

Termites and ants both construct nests in moist wood, but ant nests are typically smoother and lack mud structures commonly found in termite nests. Also, termites actually subsist on wood, so the structural damage they leave it their wake is generally more severe than that caused by ants, which merely tunnel through wood.

Nests

Carpenter ants nest in both moist and dry wood, but they prefer moist wood. Accordingly, nests are more likely to be found in wood dampened by water leaks, such as wood around bathtubs and sinks, poorly sealed windows and door frames, roof leaks and poorly flashed chimneys. Nests are especially common in moist, hollow spaces, such as the wall void behind a dishwasher and in a hollow deck column. As there will often be no external signs of damage, probing the wood with a screwdriver helps reveal the excavated “galleries.” Another technique for locating hidden nests is to tap along baseboards and other wood surfaces with the blunt end of a screwdriver while listening for the hollow sound of tunneled wood. If a nest is nearby, carpenter ants often will respond by making a rustling sound within the nest.

Inspection

The following clues are evidence that a building is host to an ant infestation:

  • long trails of ants, perhaps numbering in the hundreds or thousands. Ants assemble in long trails along structural elements, such as wires and pipes, and frequently use them to enter and travel within a structure to their destination. Follow the trail to locate their nest or their entry point, such as an electrical outlet, or gap along a baseboard or around a water pipe;Ants entering, or exiting, a lightswitch
  • a few straggler ants. These are scouts in search of food and nesting sites. They, too, may be followed back to the nest to betray their family;
  • holes or cracks in walls or foundations, especially where pipes enter the building, and around windows and doors. These can provide entry points for ants and other insects. Kitchens are other food storage and preparation areas are particular problem areas;
  • frass deposits. Frass is the fine sawdust produced after galleries are carved out of the wood. If you suspect that a piece of woodwork hosts a gallery, you can tap on it with a screwdriver tip and see if any dust falls away;
  • a distinctive rustling sound similar to the crinkling of cellophane. Ants are small, but nests are large enough to produce perceptible noise; and
  • outside, inspect for nests in mulch and vegetation next to the foundation. Check under potted plants, patio blocks, stepping stones, in piles of rocks, lumber and firewood.
Exclusion Practices
A number of steps can be taken by homeowners to reduce the potential for future ant problems, such as:
  • Store food items that attract ants, such as sugar, syrup, honey, and pet food in closed containers. Wash them to remove residues from outer surfaces.
  • Rinse out empty soft drink containers or remove them from the building.
  • Thoroughly clean up grease and spills.
  • Remove garbage from buildings daily and change liners frequently.
  • Correct roof and plumbing leaks and other moisture problems that will attract ants.
  • Eliminate wood-to-ground contact, such as where landscaping has pushed soil or mulch up against the wood siding of a home.
  • Clip back tree limbs and vegetation touching the roof or siding of the house. Limbs and branches serve as bridges between tree limb nests and the structure.
  • Seal cracks and openings in the foundation, especially where utility pipes and wires enter from the outside.
  • Stack firewood away from the foundation, and elevate it off the ground. Never store firewood in the garage or other areas of the home, as firewood is a major ant nesting area.
In summary, ants are complex creatures that create structural defects in buildings. Inspection and exclusion techniques should be practiced.

Credit of this article goes to Nick Gromicko of InterNACHI.

Home Buyer’s Due Diligence

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When considering purchasing a home it is important to consider more than just the style, price, layout, size, and location. We wanted to share some other ways to ensure that you are doing your due diligence when considering whether a particular property is the right one for you!

Choose an Appropriate Realtor

Be sure seek the assistance of an experienced real estate professional who can provide you advice, knowledge and resources to assist in finding the right home for you. Realtors do so much more than just open the doors and negotiate on your behalf. They are there to help guide you towards finding a home that properly suits your needs, desires and budget. Though not all realtors are created equal, they each have their different strengths and unique expertise.

We strongly suggest when searching for an acreage to find a realtor that is experience and specialized in acreages. There is alot more to consider when buying land outside of a city that has a well and septic tank system -for starters.

Another example is when searching for a condo it is recommended to find a condo specialist. It is important to have someone experienced with condos and can suggest a reliable professional to review the condo documents to protect your investment.

If you are looking for a income property, we suggest choosing a realtor with experience in that area. Someone who is familiar with the required permits and zoning.

If looking to move to a new city, it is beneficial to hire a realtor who is familiar with the area and can provide their insight. Different neighborhoods and communities have different demographics, amenities and property values.

We work with a large number of realtors, if you would like a referral we would be happy to connect you with a few realtors that suit your unique needs. 

Research the Area

Prior to falling in love a house, it is important that the area and location will work for you and your lifestyle. Walk  and drive around the community and to get a feel for the area.

Consider:

  • How will the commute be?
  • Are there amenities nearby that you frequently need?
  • Are you happy with the nearby walking paths, playgrounds and off leash areas? Schools district?
  • Is it a high water table or flood area?
  • Do you have a support system nearby?

Ask the Previous Owners

It is good practice to have your realtor ask the seller’s realtor to disclose any previous water leaks or major deficiencies that the previous owners have experienced. They are legally required to disclose these types of things when asked.

Get a Home Inspection

As many of our readers would agree, getting a home inspections completed is a very important step in buyer’s due diligence. During a home inspection the inspector will investigate whether the home’s components and systems are operating as they should and should point out maintenance items as well as other areas to monitor over time. Findings from this report can often be used to renegotiate the purchase price of a home, and provide you with a good understanding of the condition of the home.

Hire Specialists for Specific Concerns

Prior to waiving conditions it is helpful to hire a trade specialist to do a further in-depth investigation into specific areas of concern that have been highlighted during the home inspection.  This also provides an opportunity to obtain a realistic quote on repairs to budget for.

Keep in mind that home inspectors are generalists and are not journeyman of all areas of a home as this would take many years of school and would results in home inspections costing 4-5x as much! It can be handy to book your inspection earlier on in your condition period to allow for further due diligence on any deficiencies discovered before waiving conditions on the purchase agreement.

Budget Accordingly

When buying an older home, and even a new home, it is important to budget for repairs, maintenance and the unexpected. The life span of the following components varies based on brand, installation, maintenance and other factors, and should are only a rough estimate of the typical life span. Though it can be helpful to consider when budgeting for home maintenance. Here’s a rough estimate of the lifespan of major components of a home:

  • Hot water tanks typically have a life span of 10-12 years
  • Furnace lifespan is 20-25 years, though annual maintenance is required
  • Roofs vary based on the thickness of the shingle, type of materials and weather conditions, though roughly 12-25 years.
  • Windows vary depending on position of the home, care and installation, though on average you can expect windows to last 20 years.

In the end, many buyers go with their gut when choosing their next home though we hope you consider some of these other factors to ensure that your journey of home-ownership is a pleasurable one!

Home Inspection Warranties – The Fine Print

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90 Day Warranty Fine Print

We don’t actually offer the 90 Day Warranty because we believe in providing our clients with the best service through our many value-adding services such as:

  • Confidence in making decisions backed by the full information regarding true condition of a home
  • Licensed, certified & qualified inspector – who is committed to ongoing education
  • Friendly, approachable inspector to address your questions and concerns in plain language
  • Comprehensive standards of practice
  • Detailed report complete with photos, maintenance tips & recommendations
  • After-Inspection Support for as long as you own the home
  • Referrals to trusted vendors to help with your home’s needs

When our clients face a challenge during their journey of homeownership, we are a just a call, email or text away. We provide advice, resources, trusted vendor connections and our support. Because Our Company Cares.

Curious as to learn about the 90 Day Warranty’s that some inspection companies offer? Read below for more information so you can make an informed decision when deciding on a home inspector.

What Does the Warranty Cover?

Warranty Limits

  • Mechanical Coverage is limited to an aggregate maximum of $500
  • Structural Coverage is limited to an aggregate maximum of $2000.

Inclusions

Items reported to be in good working order at the time of inspection, limited to:

Mechanical Coverage:

  • Electrical: Main service panel, secondary service panel, and wiring
  • Plumbing: Water lines, faucets, water heaters, drain lines, gas lines
  • Appliances: Kitchen Appliances including and limited to oven, range, dishwasher, built-in microwave, trash compactor, and garbage disposal
  • Heating/Air (HVAC): Furnace, Air Conditioner, and Thermostats.

Structural Coverage

  • Poured Concrete & Block wall foundations.
  • Floor joists, bottom & top plates, and wall members.
  • Roof leak repair (does not include replacement of bad shingles), load bearing walls, attached garage doors

And now for the exclusions…

Exclusions

  • Secondary or consequential damages
  • Anything reported in to be in less than good working order
  • Water damage
  • Cosmetic repairs
  • Items that are inaccessible without the removal of drywall, concrete, or any other permanently installed covering
  • Refrigerators
  • Appliances, climate controls or fixtures older than 10 years
  • Plumbing stoppages, regardless of reason
  • Well or septic systems or any related components
  • Upgrading failed systems to meet current codes or local ordinances
  • Chimneys, fireplaces, or brick failures of any kind
  • Cracking or scaling concrete
  • Pest damage, including that caused by any and all wood destroying insects and pests
  • Damage caused by any peril is not covered by this contract, which includes but is not limited to; war, riot, civil commotion, earthquake, hurricane, any and all acts of god, or any other outside cause or neglect.

90 Days?

The warranty is limited to 90 days from the date of the inspection, or 22 days from closing whichever is greater. Most often a buyer takes possession of a home 30-60 days from the date of the inspection, leaving 30-60 days remaining of this warranty rather than 90 days from possession which was our first assumption when hearing of this warranty.

Becoming A Landlord

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Brought to you by Tara Molina – Realtor for Airdrie & Calgary Real Estate

As an Airdrie REALTOR ® and a landlord myself, I can tell you being a landlord isn’t always a walk in the park. You’re always on call, your tenants and the home are your complete responsibility. However, if you’re well prepared for becoming a landlord it will be a rewarding and positive experience! Purchasing an investment property is an activity that I encourage, as Mark Twain said:

“Buy Land They Aren’t Making Anymore!” 

Let’s dive into the 6 major factors that I have learned in my experience to not just becoming a landlord, but also to be successful at it!

Live Nearby

As the owner of the home, you will need to care for all the yard work, the plumbing, any mishaps, etc. When your tenants are locked out, you will need to head over and let them in. Living in close proximity to your rental property will ease a lot of these nuisances. You’ll be able to whip over and complete whatever it is your tenant needs. It’s also possible to hire a property manager to care for the property if you’re not able to be on call. Living close to the property also means that you can check on it from time to time to ensure everything is in order.

Know the Laws

It’s incredibly important to know tenant-landlord laws. From provincial security deposit laws to federal anti-discriminatory laws, you should know them all. As a landlord, you need to know how much notice is needed for tenants to move out, for you to show the property, etc. These laws are great general knowledge, and they’re quite straight forward. If you have questions please contact me so I can advise you!

Read Up On The Laws

Enforce Rent to be Paid on Time

This seems an obvious step, but it’s important not to get too friendly with your tenants. If you do, you might just let a late payment slide which can turn into another, and then before you know it you’re a full month’s rent behind. Being too friendly isn’t a great idea, but you should still have a solid relationship with your tenant built on respect. You are trusting someone to live in your property, therefore you should trust them to get the rent paid on time. The next tip ties into this one…

Screen Potential Tenants

When choosing someone to become your tenant, you MUST choose someone you are comfortable with. It’s standard for a potential tenant to apply for the property by answering personal questions. These questions will ask about the applicant’s employment, yearly salary, pets, relationship status etc. It’s also common to perform a background or credit check. When showing the property, ask the potential tenant questions and get to know them a little bit. You will feel much better about a stranger moving into your property if you can have a pleasant conversation with them.

Customize Your Lease

Your lease should be customized to fit your unique requirements. These requirements will include details such as if you allow pets and how many. Other aspects include details on the utilities, for example if the tenant will have to pay any of them separately. A common utility for the tenant to pay in Airdrie is electricity. Another example of something to specify is repairs. If a window breaks, what is the process of getting it fixed? As a landlord it’s important to ensure your tenant knows all the details of living there, so customize the lease with everything you think is relevant.

Inspect the Property Regularily

A huge part of being a landlord is trusting your tenants. However, this doesn’t mean you can’t inspect the property from time to time. It can be daunting having someone else live in your property – especially in the first few months. Do a drive-by to make yourself feel better. Remember though that you can’t just show up unannounced and waltz into someone else’s home. Because yes, your property is now someone’s home – remember that!

Did you know Bocc Home Inspections offers rental property walkthroughs/inspections?

Who better to check on your home than a licensed home inspector who can monitor your home for leaks and important home maintenance while ensuring your tenants are upholding to the lease arrangement. We offer home rental assistance services to help you maintain the value of your investment property.

Tara Molina

Tara Molina

Realtor for Airdrie & Calgary Real Estate

Let my knowledge and experience help guide you on your home selling or home buying journey! I’ll take the time to actually listen to your needs, answer your questions and respond quickly to you so you aren’t left in the dark. My focus is on understanding your real estate goals and working hard to create solutions that make sense for you.

How to Prep Your Home for an Inspection

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How to Prep Your Home for an Inspection

Keep in mind that often buyers attend the inspection, therefore, we recommend you treat the inspection as another showing which could make or break the sale of your home. It is always a good idea to reduce clutter and present a clean and odor free home! Be sure to leave the house too so that your buyers can feel comfortable and the inspector can complete an efficient home inspection. Here are some other ways to help prep your home for a smooth home inspection:

Make it clean and accessible for the inspector:

  • Clean toilets
  • Remove extra stored items underneath sinks
  • Remove childproofing from receptacles
  • Remove storage away from the furnace, hot water tank and electrical panel
  • Make sure the attic hatch is accessible. Cover clothes and items beneath with plastic poly if you are worried about the insulation mess
  • Remove pets from the home
  • Remove laundry and dishes from your machines as they will be tested

Help ensure your home ‘passes’:

  • Replace burnt out light bulbs
  • Install a new air filter in furnace
  • Have all gas, electricity & water shut offs turned on
    (Except for the exterior water during winter)
  • Put your downspouts down
  • Fix any issues that you are aware of
  • Leave out invoices for important previous repair
Accurate Home Inspection Calgary

Important Questions to Ask During Your Home Inspection

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At Bocc Home Inspections we like to help educate our clients on the important items of their new home. We do this through including tips and photographs in the report, marking important shut offs with custom tags, demonstrating how and where the following items are within each home.

Here is a list of questions we suggest to ask during your home inspection:

  • Grading: Is the grade around my entire home sloped away from my foundation walls and window wells?
  • Smoke alarms: How do I test the smoke detector?
  • Ventilation: What is a ventilation switch? Should it be on or off? How does it work with the heating system?
  • Furnace: Where is the disconnect breaker or switch located for the furnace?
  • Water: Where is the main water shut off? Kitchen and bathroom sink water shut off (if present)? Toilet water shut off?
  • Electrical: Where is the electrical panel? How do I turn breakers on and off and how do I reset them?
  • Detectors: Where are the smoke detectors, carbon monoxide detectors, arc fault circuit interrupters and ground fault circuit interrupters? Where are the instruction manuals that are provided with these devices?
  • Eavestroughs: Are the eavestrough down spouts connected and directed away from my home and not towards my neighbour?

At Bocc Home Inspections we like to answer these questions and provide tips on these extra things to help ensure our clients can have a healthy and sound home, Because Our Company Cares For first time home buyers we also include a home maintenance manual as an extra resource for their journey of homeownership.

Make Sure Home Improvement Projects are Up to Code Before Selling

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Make sure home improvement projects are up to code before selling!

Make Sure Your Home Improvement/Maintenance Projects are Up to Code Before Selling

It’s almost always a good idea to boost the appeal of your property prior to listing a home for sale. But there are right ways and wrong ways to do it. If you’re handy and creative, there is no reason not to tackle some of the routine maintenance and upkeep items yourself. But, depending on the scope and size of the improvements, you might be required to seek permission and approval of your local government officials.

Knowing when to do so is key to your success. Neglecting prior approval and final inspection may potentially negate all your good intentions, cost you additional money and, perhaps, even make your property unsalable.

Building Codes

Most governmental jurisdictions and some neighbourhood associations require that homeowners submit plans and seek approval for major projects. Additions, structural alterations, plumbing and electrical improvements, and various other home projects are likely to require permits and inspections. Your city might require a permit to build a fence or a wall, to pour concrete for a driveway, to have a new roof installed, or to change out the windows for more energy-efficient models. Always check with the authorities before beginning any work.

Generally, no permit is needed to replace kitchen appliances or plumbing fixtures, to repaint interior walls or replace flooring, or to add decorative lighting and landscaping elements. But, if your home is located in a gated community or a subdivision that has strict association requirements, you might need committee approval for exterior alterations.

While most of the requirements detailed in the National Building Code of Canada address safety, design and construction of new commercial buildings, the code also governs demolition, use changes and alterations to existing buildings. A significant portion of the code addresses housing and small buildings. Recent code changes deal with stairways and ramps, railings and guardrails, among other updates. Associated standards deal with fire safety, electrical standards, plumbing requirements and energy. Individual provinces and jurisdictions may impose additional or slightly different requirements.

Know the Requirements

National and local standards are enforced by local building inspectors. Although existing homes may not be in compliance with current codes, it is important to remember that buyers are looking for safety and value. It can be financially advantageous to make changes that modernize your property on top of the usual upgrades you may be thinking of.

Always check with local authorities regarding current code requirements for insulation, electrical standards, plumbing, heating and air conditioning systems, ventilation and vent pipes, fans and toxic substance detectors, in addition to standards for stairs and railings, and for driveways and walkways. Whether you do the work yourself or hire a contractor, ask about permits and fees, and whether or not inspections are required.

Document the Changes

Most buyers will respond favourably to evidence of updates that reduce energy costs, increase home safety, or add to a home’s usability and appearance. Keep detailed records of costs and dates, permits and inspections, whether you replace an old water heater, install new attic insulation, or repair an ailing fence. Take before and after pictures if it’s appropriate. If you complete an addition, relocate the electrical panel, or add a sliding glass door, note when the work was completed, the names of architects and contractors, and the date of final inspection, issuance of a certificate of occupancy or project approval. Also keep a copy of the approved plans and any materials specifications or product warranties.

Your home projects, no matter how large or small, should result in a faster sale and a higher price. If you have questions about the value of planned improvements, you might want to check with a certified home inspector or your real estate agent.

Winterization for our Calgary Winters

By | Healthy Home, Home Inspections, Home Maintenance, Winterizing | No Comments

Fall is the the best time to start winterizing your home before you find yourself with problems to fix in the middle of -20 weather.   Whether you choose to have a professional handle these items or if you are the do it yourself type of person, here’s a list of things you should consider addressing before winter.

Inside: 

Furnace Cleaning: A dirty furnace is less efficient and more likely to have mechanical issues. Have your furnace inspected and cleaned every 2 years (rather than 1) based on feedback from a HVAC Cleaning specialist. If you are in need of a recommendation, please don’t hesitate to contact us, we would be happy to refer you to a quality company.

Change Air Filter: For healthy, indoor air, change your air filter once every 4 to 6 weeks, and we recommend the less expensive filters as they allow more airflow which increases the efficiency of your HVAC system.

Vacuum Heating Vents: Take off the covers and hoses to your dryer, bathroom and stove vents and suction out lint and debris.  This will increase efficiency and decrease fire hazards.

Winterizing your A/C: It is best practice to cover your A/C in the winter season to prevent excess dirt, debris and mold from building up in the A/C unit and to extend the longevity of the A/C. As a fail-safe measure to protect yourself from turning on your A/C via your thermostat with the cover still on, we recommend removing or flipping the breaker on the exterior of the home beside the A/C.

Replace Batteries in Detectors: October is Fire Awareness Month so use it as a reminder to replace batteries in smoke detectors, carbon monoxide alarms and other safety instruments.

Attic Insulation: A quick way to see if your have enough insulation on the floor of your attic is to simply look across the floor of your attic.  If the insulation is level with or below your floor joists, more insulation is needed. There should be no low spots. Be sure not to cover any recessed light fixtures or soffit vents. Keep at least 3” away from lights (unless insulated ceiling rated). About 10-14” thick insulation or R -38 insulation is recommended.

Weatherstripping: Inspect the weather stripping around your doors to ensure it is in and as a good fit. There are generally one of three types: metal, foam plastic or plastic stripping. Check the metal for dents, bends and straightness.  Check foam plastic for resiliency, and plastic stripping for brittleness and cracks. Make sure it is securely held in place. Proper weather stripping is very helpful to prevent cold drafts, energy loss and other issues. If you are having condensation build-up on the interior of your windows this may mean that you have your humidity level too high, it should be between 30-40%. It also may mean that you are not getting adequate air flow.  Be sure to frequently open your blinds throughout your home to allow airflow in there areas to prevent excess moisture and prevent mold growth.

Water Heater: Drain this annually to help prevent any build up of scale inside the heater.

Outside

Drain Outside Faucets: Water pipes can freeze, swell and burst in the winter months, causing significant damage.  Turn the external shut valve off and open the faucet until the drip stops. And if you can find a place for your hoses indoors then bring them in to extend their life expectancy.

Downspouts: Use a ladder, gloves and a garbage bag to remove debris from the past year. Run water from a hose through the downspouts to ensure they are unclogged. Ensure downspouts are down and have extensions to discharge the water away from the foundation of your home.

Install Gutter Guards: Gutter guards are a good idea to minimize the amount of debris accumulated, but you’ll still need to check for clogs once a year in the fall.

Lawn Equipment: Run all gas powered lawn equipment until the fuel is gone.  Sitting inside your machine over the winter can cause avoidable wear/tear and cause fire hazards.

Seal Foundation: Repair and seal holes with a quality caulking material. Small cracks and holes in foundations are inevitable and can potentially lead to further damage if left untreated.

Inspect Roof Shingles: Shingles protect everything in the home so don’t overlook it. Also, include the metal flashing at all the roof joints to look for signs of leaking, rotting or damage.

Additional Resources:

• City of Calgary Inspections and maintenance for homeowners

• ATCO Gas

 

We love feedback!  Let us know what you do to winterize your home!

Writing Credit

We would like to thank Tyler Baptist (Realtor) for collaborating with us on writing this important blog on winterization. Tyler is a very personable, professional and passionate realtor here in the Calgary Area. Tyler Baptist, also know as the ‘Divorce Realtor’, specializes in easing the separation process for couples through providing resources and her experience to help ensure both individuals can come out on top.

Tyler Baptist

As a CENTURY 21® Real Estate professional, I am dedicated to providing you with the highest quality service possible. My personal knowledge of the Calgary and Airdrie Real Estate market is combined with the power of the CENTURY 21 brand – the most recognized name in Real Estate today.

Let me assist you in finding your dream home, in a neighbourhood that is right for you, and in the price range you want. Or if you are interested in selling a property, I also have the expertise to help you get the fastest sale possible and at the best price.

I look forward to the opportunity of working for you!

New Home Warranty

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New Home Warranty

What is a New Home Warranty?

The Alberta government now ensures that there is a minimum of a “1-2-5-10” coverage on a newly built homes who building permit application was submitted after February 1, 2014.  Prior to this legislation home builders often offered varying degrees of a new home warranty, and may continue to offer higher standards than the minimum “1-2-5-10” coverage.

There are a number of warranty providers for home builders to choose from, it is good to know which provider your builder has partnered with. Familiarize yourself with your warranty provider, key warranty dates, and steps to take if you ever need to make a claim. Prior to expiry, we encourage having a licensed & certified professional inspector help ensure that your home’s major systems are built properly through a top to bottom new home warranty inspection.

What is Covered?

1-2-5-10 Coverage

1 Year: Labor and Materials
This includes everything within a home, even the cosmetic items such as trim, flooring and fixtures.

2 Year: Distribution Systems
Distribution systems includes your Heating, Plumbing and Electrical.

5 Year: Building Envelope
The shell of your home, such as wall framing, window installation, siding and roof.

10 Year: Structural Elements
Structural elements that are load bearing or that can cause structural damage such as the footings, beams, floor systems, foundation walls, framing and roof trusses.

What Can We Do For You?

Having a licensed residential inspector ensures that the structural deficiencies that the common homeowner is unaware of will be found so any necessary fixes can be addressed while they are under the home warranty.

Once your home is built, you’re responsible for basic maintenance and upkeep, such as cleaning out eavestroughs and changing furnace filters. You’re also responsible for maintaining appropriate grading with any new landscaping work. Let us provide knowledge on the proper upkeep of the systems within your home to help ensure you can maintain the value of your home!

Request for New Home Warranty Inspection:

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Warranty Expiry Details

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7 Important Facts About Mold

By | Healthy Home, Home Inspections, Home Maintenance, Indoor Air Quality, Mold, Uncategorized | No Comments
  1. Mold Spores are Practically Everywhere

Mold spores occur in every home and are impossible to eliminate from inside your home. Mold spores are brought inside a home through our windows, doors, heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. They also enter indoor spaces by attaching to our clothing, pets, shoes, bags and even our building materials!

The key to preventing mold growth is by controlling moisture levels in your home; an ideal humidity level is between 30 to 40%.

  1. Not all Mold is Bad

Not all mold is bad; in fact, mold has an important purpose in our eco-system to consume dead organic material. With that being said, it can also pose as health hazards when it begins growing in indoor environments. People react differently to mold based on the length of exposure, type of mold, respiratory system, their immunity and allergies. Children, pregnant women and elders are more prone to develop health symptoms.

  1. Why Does Mold Growth Happen Indoors

 Homes can be a perfect environment for mold to growth being that they have ample food sources for mold – building materials and water. Molds feeds on organic material, within a home tends to grow in areas of: wood & wood products, paper & paper-like products, fabric, drywall, leather, fabric, cement, carpet, and grout.

     4Is My Home at Risk for Mold

There is always a risk of some of the mold spores that are present in your home taking sprout and growing, given that they have their key ingredient for growth – moisture!

The commonly known sources of moisture include floods; backed-up sewers; leaky roofs and/or water leaks. Though there are also less familiarly know culprits, such as a humidifier (requires regular cleanings); damp basements or crawl spaces; house plants; steam from cooking and showers; wet clothes hung to dry indoors; inadequate air exchange; excessive humidity; and condensation (which is especially a problem during the winter, on poorly insulated surfaces).

In the presence of moisture, the ideal temperature and ample food, mold will begin growing within 24 to 48 hours.

Did You know? You should always run your bathroom fan for 2X the time you ran your shower?”

  1. Most Mold Is Hidden

Most people think their home does not have mold because they can not see it. This is a problem as most mold is hidden; it can often be discovered behind a leaky shower or tub, behind walls or attics to name a few.

Mold can be detected through smell, visual clues, and knowledge of the building history, and often requires trained professionals with the proper tools, experience and knowledge.

  1. What is Involved in A Mold Inspection?

The first step a mold inspector / indoor air quality specialist will conduct is an assessment to determine if mold may be an issue in a home. The professional will use information regarding building history, health of occupants, moisture readings, and conduct a visual inspection with the assistance of a thermal imaging to investigate for moisture problems and visible apparent mold.

The inspector may also collect mold samples, either with a swab test, tape sample or air quality test for lab analysis to determine the type of mold and spore count present.  The goal of these tests is to determine the extent of the mold problem to allow for recommendations to address the mold issue.

If the tests indicate that there mold is present, then the first step is to fix the source of the moisture problem before removing the mold and having the air cleaned with an ozone blasting treatment.

  1. Failure to Fix a Mold Problem Results in Reduced Property Value

Mold is a serious issue.  If left untreated, it continues to grow and deteriorate the building materials and impact the air quality in your home. Mold is a living organism, as long as it has the ideal living conditions and food sources, it will continue to strive. Failure to fix the underlying causes of mold and effectively removing the mold will lead to further structural damage and reduced property value.
Take the first step to protecting your greatest investment by taking our short online Air Quality Assessment to see whether there may be a mold or air quality problem in your home.

Questions about mold? Call us (403) 585-6279 or email us.  We look forward to helping you ensure your home is healthy and safe!